VQ Warbirds B-24 Liberator 110″ ARF Flight Review

This is where the work pays off!

To close the loop on the on the VQ Warbirds B-24 Liberator, this week we’re going in depth on the radio setup, CG and flying of this beautiful scale model!  This is such an impressive airplane and it truly does not disappoint in the air.  This is one that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed having it in my hangar and I’m looking forward to bringing it out to some events later this year.

Interestingly, when mentioning heavy bomber aircraft of World War II, undoubtedly, the first bomber that comes to many peoples’ minds is the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.  However, few realize that the Consolidated B-24 Liberator was built in greater numbers than any other US bomber of WWII.  Given the B-24’s distinctive twin rudder design and high aspect ratio “Davis” wing, the 4-engine heavy bomber provides an unmistakable shape.  The airplane was designed for a purpose and it served that purpose well throughout the war with over 18,500 total B-24s from 1940-1945.  The B-24 served in every branch of the American Armed Forces during the war and in fact, offered greater range, greater speed, and greater bomb load capacity than the B-17.

 

WHAT’S IN THE AIRPLANE

To recap from the assembly review, this B-24 Liberator is a great sized ARF of all wood construction coming in at a 110″ wingspan.  At final ready to fly weight of 26.5 lb the airplane doesn’t even notice it at all in the air.  From day 1, this airplane flew straight as an arrow requiring only just a couple clicks of aileron trim on the maiden.  The power from the 4 Himax motors and Master Airscrew props feels absolutely perfect for the airplane as it has plenty of thrust at full throttle, but still cruises around at partial throttle easily and efficiently.  Here are the final specs and equipment that were used in the airplane:

 

AIRCRAFT SETUP & CG

In flying this airplane, I found that the recommended CG and control throws in the manual were spot on for the model and I found no reason to adjust any of them.  The airplane does have a big high aspect ratio wing and you do visually see the resulting Continue reading

VQ Warbirds B-24 Liberator 110″ ARF Assembly Review

The B-24 Liberator…4 Engines = 4x the fun!

I had really hoped to get this together much sooner, but life sure had other plans I think.  Anyhow, I thought it would be worthwhile to provide all of the supplemental information specific to the assembly of the VQ Warbirds B-24 Liberator especially since the Model Airplane News review article that this was assembled for has now come and gone.  Disclaimer up front, this is a pretty extensive assembly write-up, but I figured it best to put it all in one place for anyone who finds this article.  The goal is to provide all the information you need to get this great looking and flying airplane in the air with as much ease as possible.

Meanwhile over Europe...

Now, as ARFs go, this B-24 Liberator definitely takes some work but you are rewarded with a beautiful looking and flying warbird that’s a great size at 110″ wingspan.  As a whole, the assembly was fun and the model went together quite well.  It’s a 4 engine bomber, so the joy is getting to install anything propulsion related 4 times!  Oh, and if you’d like a sneak peak at the flying, then here’s my initial thoughts video that I did prior to the release of the MAN article. 🙂  I’ll be doing a separate flight review article and video here soon once our fields are open again.

The airplane comes as a blank canvas without any kind of markings applied which provides some great opportunities for customization.  Trying to find something out of the ordinary, I came across the B-24s from the 834th Bombardment Squadron, also known as the “Zodiacs Squadron.”  The one that really drew my attention dawned the nose art of “Scorpio” having a caricature of a scorpion with an aviator helmet holding a bomb with a gun turret on its tail.  CPL Phil Brinkman, a commercial artist assigned to the squadron, painted the nose art for each of the aircraft which were themed by the 12 signs of the zodiac.  Interestingly, the “Scorpio” nose art was later adopted as the squadron logo.

I should note before we get started that if you’ve never assembled an ARF before, they are a great way to start out in getting an understanding of radio and propulsion system Continue reading