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The RC Geek Blog is your place to learn about all aspects of the RC hobby.  Learn to build, design, drive or fly that RC project you’ve always wanted to build, but have been intimidated to try.  This blog is here to help you on your journey and provide tips and tricks as you go!  My hope is to inspire builders both experienced and new!  So, welcome, please look around, it’s an exciting beginning!  I’m currently documenting my latest competition scale RC jet build, a Mark Frankel F4D Skyray, along with some other fun tips and videos.  If you can’t find what you’re looking for on this front page, click on any of the categories to the right and it will show just posts related to those categories.  Please feel free to add comments and/or contact me directly if you have questions, I’m here to help!  And don’t forget to check out my YouTube Channel, I post new videos every week!

Chris Wolfe (The RC Geek)

 

Foam Kit Bashing 101 Finale — Kfir Setup, Flight Review & Making Repairs

Fly, crash, repair…repeat…

Check out the full series of videos and articles at: thercgeek.com/kitbashing

Welcome to the final episode in our foam kit bashing series!  It was quite the journey getting here and I actually didn’t intend on it taking as long as it has to document the whole series, but life has been crazy with no signs of slowing down it seems (plus, I just started a new position at work!).  If you’ve just found this series, we have gone through and completely transformed a Freewing Mirage 2000 into an Isreali Kfir.  As a part of that, we covered the transformation process talking through the building methods in converting the airplane using balsa wood and foam, we’ve talked about painting and finishing and we’ve also covered how to make panel lines and add realistic weathering.  I hope that you guys have enjoyed the series and are geared up with some new techniques to try on your models!  To finish this series up, I thought it would be best done providing a little discussion on how the airplane flies in it’s new form as well as some of the things that were done in wrapping the airplane up and getting it tuned in the air.  Also, I had a little incident with the airplane at the Warbirds & Classics event which tore out the right main landing gear mount.  So, I thought it would be a good opportunity, now that we have this nice new airplane, to show how to make cosmetic repairs when they are needed as well.

RADIO SETUP

In doing all of the final setup for the airplane, I didn’t want to change too many things all at once since the airplane flew well in the Mirage 2000 configuration.  I knew however that I did want to change out the radio.  Airtronics has been my go-to radio for quite literally, decades (even had a sponsorship with them).  Though a good radio, it’s a system that’s just not supported in the US anymore and frankly, SANWA/Airtronics gave up on the airplane market years ago anyway.

I’ve been flying the Graupner MZ-24Pro for a while now and have found it to be a really Continue reading

Assembly & Flight Review – E-Flite 2.1m Carbon-Z Cessna 150 Aerobat

TIME TO TAKE ON THE SNAKE!

If you’ve ever seen the movie Iron Eagle, there’s an incredible sequence in the movie where the lead character, Doug Masters, flies a Cessna 150 through this race they call “the snake.”  This consists of him racing a guy (Knocher) on a motorcycle through a canyon.  It’s a totally hokey scenario and it results in a kind of crash landing due to the guy Doug’s racing sabotaging the airplane (of course!).  Though, I think Doug might have had a better chance if he wasn’t racing with full flaps down…  That said, the whole flying sequence is a display of some pretty incredible flying by Art Scholl who was an amazing aerobatic pilot from back in the day.  He flew for a number of movies throughout his carrier but unfortunately his carrier ended too soon while filming the spin scene for the movie Top Gun.

So, when I saw the E-Flite 2.1m Cessna 150 Aerobat, it took me back to when I watched Iron Eagle over and over as a kid (quite literally) and I knew that I wanted one.  It captures everything great about the airplane and that sequence as the airplane looks great and flies aerobatics wonderfully.  So, there just might be a repaint in this airplanes future…  but before that, I wanted to give you guys a full review on this awesome Aerobat.  The box is huge, and the airplane is big, and it’s awesome!

 

ASSEMBLY NOTES

As noted, the airplane comes in a very sizable box that took up most of my workbench.  The airplane is nicely packaged and I didn’t find any damage at all through shipping.  E-flite has broken the airplane down into a small number of large components.  You have the fuselage, the wings and horizontal stabilizers, Continue reading

Foam Kit Bashing 101 Ep5 — How to Add Realistic Panel Lines and Weathering

Whether or not to weather or not…?

Check out the full series of videos and articles at: thercgeek.com/kitbashing

Last time we covered how to paint camouflage and talked about application of markings.  In this episode, we’re talking about panel lines and weathering!  I get questions quite often about my weathering techniques, so the following tips are some of my simple secrets. 😉

Panel lines and weathering are something that can really make or break a scale model.  When we started this Kfir kit bash, I knew that I wanted to use it as a canvas to show some simple weathering and panel lining techniques.  Very often we can get too heavy with either and so my hope here is to give some pointers for adding some realistic and effective looking panel lines and weathering that’s easy to do.  These are some techniques that are pretty simple to employ and that I actually use on my competition models also.

There are so many different techniques we can turn to for this stuff, so these are just a few that I regularly use.  Ultimately the best techniques are the ones you like and give you the results you’re looking for so experiment and try different techniques.  The only way we develop these skills is through practice and use.

As we talk about panel lines and weathering, my recommendation is less is more.  What I mean is that if you feel that a panel line is too dark, or the weathering is too heavy, then it probably is.  Also, it’s highly recommended doing all of this final finish work inside under artificial light.  The sun washes out much of what we apply and so the results are much less subtle once we bring the airplane inside since we’ll continue to darken until we can see a result.  So, just a couple things to keep in mind as we go through this (it’ll be stated again too 😉 ).

THE PANEL LINE PROCESS

To apply panel lines to the surface, we are simply applying all of them using a mechanical pencil.  This works excellent in this case because the pencil lines when applied, are darker than all of the colors on the airplane.  So, as a result, you can get a Continue reading

Foam Kit Bashing 101 Ep4 — Painting Camouflage and Adding Markings

Camouflage me this…

Check out the full series of videos and articles at: thercgeek.com/kitbashing

Continuing in our Kit Bashing 101 series, in this installment we are talking about painting camouflage and adding markings to our Kfir.  The transformation from Mirage 2000 to Kfir has taken place and we’ve even added some nice Kfir specific cockpit details.  So, there’s no more procrastinating, it’s time to prep and paint this jet!  We have an awesome 4 tone Isreali camouflage scheme lined up that we’re going to paint and so we’ll talk through the process of achieving that.  We’ll be utilizing an airbrush in the process along with some humbrol plastic model paints for the camouflage and then once painted, we will be applying our markings.

First things first though, the airplane was made paint ready.  The process used was the same as what we did in our How to Refinish a Foam Warbird Series where we applied 6 coats of minwax polycrylic, primered and sanded a few times, and then finished it off by wet sanding with 600 grit sand paper to get it paint ready.  There were a couple things done differently here though that are worth mentioning.  First of all, there was quite a bit of texture coming through after the initial primer coat, so I decided to spray a some Rust Oleum gap filler primer.  This helped build up the lower areas to even out the surface.  After sanding it down with a sanding block, many of the imperfections disappeared.  Being foam it’s difficult to get a perfectly smooth finish, but this helped really smooth it out.  Also, this primer is ideal for prepping 3d printed parts and getting rid of the striations you get due to the layer build up.

The last thing was, I had a couple areas of the pink Home Depot foam react to the Evercoat primer when I applied it too heavy which melted some areas underneath the polycrylic.  To fix it I just filled it back in with some spackle and sanded it flush.  I’ve Continue reading

Warbirds & Classics 2017 RC Airshow

It’s hard to believe that the year is half over already!  It feels like since the US Scale Master’s Championships last year until now, I haven’t done all that much flying.  At least certainly not as much as I could hope for.  Between my kids getting into competitive travel sports added to having limited accessibility to our flying field here where I fly my large airplanes, it’s been a little difficult just getting to the field.  So when the Scale Squadron’s Warbirds & Classics event peeked around the corner, needless to say I was excited!  It was going to be 2 straight days of RC airplane goodness and some much needed flying!  Leading up to the event, I had been focusing my spare time in the shop trying to get our little kfir kit bash project finished up for the event and this was her debut outing!

Between the Scale Squadron’s hospitality, the picturesque back drop of OCMA’s Black Starr canyon flying site, and the incredible assortment of airplanes, this event is a must go for me.  I look forward to it every year and there’s always a ton of flying to be had.  Plus, it’s a chance to spend a weekend flying with my dad which I cherish deeply.  The beauty of the event is that there’s a great assortment of airplanes, but there’s never an issue with the flight line backing up causing much of a line.  Anytime anyone wants a flight, it usually happens straight away.

The event took place Saturday June 9 thru Sunday June 11.  I was there Friday and Saturday with my A-7 Corsair II, ASM Tigercat, and newly finished Kfir.  Through those two days, I Continue reading

UMX Adventures – E-Flite UMX A-10 Warthog Flight Review

The UMX Warthog that will have you brrrrrt while you fly!

Ever since the UMX A-5A Vigilante scratch build project with my friend Brent, I have been playing with a few UMX aircraft of late.  I have to say that there are some really great and unique UMX airplanes out there and Horizon Hobby has really been leading that charge.  The technology is such that you can create some really neat projects at basically 1/32 to 1/24 scale…essentially plastic model sized!  So, when the E-flite UMX A-10 arrived at my door step, needless to say, I was stoked!  I had been eyeing the airplane for a while, though surprisingly hadn’t seen one fly in person to that point.  I had heard that they fly great and so was excited to give the airplane a try.

The full sized A-10 is arguably one of the most iconic attack aircraft of all time and is just an incredible machine.  Designed for the close air support role, it really succeeds in that mission sporting a 30mm nose cannon and having a considerable stores carriage capability to back it up.   Mention the A-10 and usually someone in the room will crack off with brrrrrrt!  Emulating of course the sound of the 30mm cannon firing (What else would you think that was!? 😉 ).  So to see a twin EDF UMX A-10 realized and on the market is awesome and this cute little A-10 looks the part really well.

 

WHAT’S IN THE BOX?

The cool thing with these micros is they come out of the box completely assembled and ready to go.  All that is needed is a flight battery to install and a Spektrum radio (all the E-Flite UMX’s are Bind n’ Fly).  Opening the box and unpacking the airplane, you are met Continue reading

UMX Adventures – The DIY UMX A-5 Vigilante Team Up

THE ONE WEEK UMX A-5 VIGILANTE BUILD

Once in a long while my good Friend Brent (Corsair Nut) gets to spend some time in San Diego.  We’ve been friends since we were kids as his dad used to work for my dad at one point in the shop.  I have memories of him, his brother and I running around the back of the shop just doing what kids do.  We reconnected about 10 or so years ago and pretty much picked up where we left off!  So when he’s in town, there’s always some RC madness going on whether sporadic fly days or projects and it’s great!  We’re always encouraging and pushing each other to go for that next project or running ideas off of each other on builds, etc.  One thing about Brent, he is a master when it comes to working with foam and he’s shown me a lot of the techniques that I’ve been sharing with you.  So, when he mentioned he was coming to town, we talked about teaming up on a quick Ultra Micro (UMX) jet.  The subject? The A-5 Vigilante.

We actually planned this project (including sizing some drawings!) over a year ago on one of his previous trips.  For me, I have always had this airplane in mind for a build as the proportions are perfect for an RC subject.  It has a big wing, big tails and a nice wide fuselage which means good flying characteristics.  For a big bird, landing gear are kind of an issue (they always are!), but for a UMX bird like this, that’s no matter.  Fixed gear chicken legs here we come!

BTW, I have included the templates for the build further down in the article (no instructions), so if you’d like to give building one a shot, do it!

Now, I can’t say I was a huge help in the building process since our schedules really didn’t line up very well for the week he was here.  Add to that that I was a hand down based on abroken finger I was 3 weeks into resulting from an ice hockey injury.  I was fresh out of a cast but had a removable splint and couldn’t grip anything very well still even without the Continue reading

Foam Kit Bashing 101 Ep3 — Pilot Painting and Cockpit Details

How to Paint a Pilot Bust and Add Simple Cockpit Details

Check out the full series of videos and articles at: thercgeek.com/kitbashing

One of the features that always gets inspected on a scale model is the cockpit.  There are so many gadgets in the cockpit of a full sized aircraft, it’s fun to see what was modeled.  Yet, when it comes to ARFs and foamies, we’re lucky to get a decent pilot let alone a decent looking cockpit!  So, in this episode of our Foam Kit Bashing Series, we’re going to talk about some quick and easy ways to dress up an otherwise minimalist cockpit.  The whole idea here are simple things that can be done that add big results.  We’ll cover full scratch building of a cockpit in a future episode.  Oh, and in case you missed it, last time we talked about the whole construction process of converting a Freewing Mirage 2000 into an Isreali Kfir.  This airplane has really transformed and looks awesome as a kfir.

Before prepping and painting the airframe (we’ll cover painting in our next episode), we really should work out the cockpit interior first since we need to pull the canopy off the airframe to work on it.  It’s better to do this earlier in the process just in case we mess something up it will be an easier fix.  The base cockpit provided with the Mirage 2000 is ok, but there are definitely a few issues that we’re going to fix.  First off, the pilot is just too small for scale.  To solve this, we’re going to replace him with a 1/12 scale Castle 5 bust which comes from my folks at JetHangar.com and show you how to paint him (this is one of the pilots I manufacture for my folks in sizes ranging from 1/18 scale all the way up to 1/6 scale).  The second thing we’re going to do is show how to make the cockpit a little more “popcorn” proof and then detail it a little bit to make it a little more Kfir representative.  The stock cockpit is black and inside a sealed compartment and had already “popcorned” up…so, now is our time to fix that.

HOW TO PAINT A “CASTLE 5” PILOT BUST

Painting a nice looking pilot is not a difficult thing to do and is something that can actually be done pretty quickly.  We first off need a selection of paint brushes.  I have a number of paint brushes that I turn to when I’m painting a pilot.  I’ll use a wider, kind of square brush Continue reading